Historic Wintersburg, Huntington Beach

Historic Wintersburg in Huntington Beach is a National Treasure historic site representing over a century of Japanese immigrant and Japanese American history, representative of Japanese American settlement of the American West. The property consists of six extant structures on a 4.5-acre (1.8 ha). Historic Wintersburg (the C.M. Furuta Gold Fish Farm and the Wintersburg Japanese Mission) is recognized nationally as a rare, Japanese pioneer-owned property with intact physical features that convey the progression of Japanese American history.  In 2014, Historic Wintersburg was named one of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places and in 2015 it was designated a National Treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Washington, D.C.

Historic Wintersburg is representative of Orange County's early agricultural history and the West Coast's immigration and civil liberties history. Three generations of Japanese American history are represented: immigration of the Issei from Japan in the late 19th century, restrictions on immigration and marriage, the exclusion and discrimination of California’s Alien Land Laws, the incarceration of Americans of Japanese descent during World War II, and the return to California to recover lives after World War II confinement.

The Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force is partnered with the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Trust for Public Land in an effort to purchase the property from its current owner, the waste management company Republic Services, for preservation as a historic site and public park.  Discussions with Republic Services are entering the third year and the Historic Wintersburg property remains endangered.

 

More information at www.HistoricWintersburg.blogspot.com and on the Wikipedia page at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historic_Wintersburg_in_Huntington_Beach,_California#Preservation_of_Historic_Wintersburg

Furuta - Gold Fish Farm_watermark.jpg
MISSION - 1910.jpg
Krista Nicholds